Paljassaare Harbour

  • Paljassaare Harbour
    Paljassaare Harbour
  • Paljassaare Harbour
    Paljassaare Harbour
  • Paljassaare Harbour
    Paljassaare Harbour
  • Paljassaare Harbour
    Paljassaare Harbour

1153 Paljassaare Harbour

Circulation and movement flows easily between the main infrastructure of roads to the finer grain of streets, courts and squares.
  • Paljassaare Harbour
    Paljassaare Harbour
  • Paljassaare Harbour
    Paljassaare Harbour
client: KS Holding, Petromaks
location: Tallinn, Estonia
site: 60 ha
design:
2006 to 2010
program: 1,051,000 m2 mixed use
cost:
team: ARS Architekten, Chris Moller
tags: Tallinn, Estonia, Harbour, urban, commission

Paljassaare Harbour is a distinctive part of north Tallinn’s physical fabric defined by the industrial dockside landscape of robust cranes and warehouses in contrast with the natural elements of water, bird and sea life. Research has revealed there is currently no deep harbour marina in Tallinn, suggesting that mixed-use urban development should be combined with a deep water marina. This would lead to the realization of a truly unique environment in Tallinn.

Our proposal is defined by the water-edge landscape to inform the ethos of the whole project including the quayside promenade and marina as the major public space for the entire development to form the backbone which links all development zones including a new island. The edge weaves providing stunning views through a landscape of cranes, yacht masts, sculptural bridges and warehouses for markets and recreational facilities to create a lively public realm. A consistent urban form of five storey buildings is centred around courtyards and squares to maximize shelter from the wind and exposure to the sun while ensuring good quality high density low energy building technology. By contrast a series of selective higher buildings stand out like rocks amongst the consistent seascape of five storey buildings providing a distinctive new skyline visible from the City Centre across the water.

Circulation and movement flows easily between the main infrastructure of roads such as Paljassaare Street to the finer grain of streets, courts and squares to the water edge by providing underground car parking and a clear urban design language of street profiles, materials and urban street furniture to ensure minimum disturbance by cars to the primarily pedestrian atmosphere of the project.